Chronic Illness: Making it Work

Companies with more flexible working arrangements can have lower turnover and higher productivity

There is a growing number of people on disability benefits who suffer from various types of chronic illness — everything from multiple sclerosis and colitis, to diabetes and heart disease. Some people have disabilities so severe that they are unable to work.

The nature of chronic illness means the symptoms are unpredictable. In addition, signs of these illnesses are often not visible, which leads to the incorrect perception that people with a chronic illness are not really as sick as they say they are.

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WRITTEN BY
Jason Reid
Jason Reid consults with organizations on how to integrate the chronically ill workforce. He also coaches managers and executives with underlying health conditions. He writes about chronic illness issues on his website sickwithsuccess.com