The Missing 15% of High Performance

Why do some leaders excel while others perish? Especially when the same effort is given and the same determination to succeed is apparent? It’s all in their approach.

The way in which we approach tasks, relationships and change dictates our performance. Most successful people show up ready to meet day-to-day tasks and relationships with enthusiasm. This enthusiasm alone is often at the heart of 85% of their success.

But what about the other 15%? Research from the Institute for Health and Human Potential in Barrie, Ont., suggests that what separates the merely successful individuals from those who are truly at the top of their game, at the top of the pile, and living healthy, balanced lifestyles — is how they approach this remaining 15%. The dreaded tasks. The difficult relationships. We all have them, and we have all developed ways of dealing with them that are not always productive. It is often called avoiding.

For example, an employee named Anne receives harsh feedback from a manager suddenly one day at a training session. Anne believes she has always had a good relationship with her manager, and the information does not fit her self image. She may choose not to discuss it her manager, and instead personalize and rationalize it. What is the effect on the team? What happens to her if she takes this home?

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Dr.Pawliw-Fry
WRITTEN BY
Dr. JP Pawliw-Fry
The Power of Approach: Doing What’s Difficult, is based on seven years of research at the Institute for Health and Human Potential. Dr. J.P. Pawliw-Fry is an internationally sought-after speaker and thought leader on the subject of emotional intelligence.