A New Concept: Psychological Capital

Most business people know what intellectual capital is, and they are familiar with the concept of social capital. However, far fewer business people have heard of the newer concept of psychological capital. This is must-learn. Research has shown that that embedding the drivers of psychological capital in a work culture can not only foster happy, healthy employees, but it can also play a significant role in achieving excellent performance.

Psychological capital, or PsyCap, is form of capital that involves the personal resources people bring to their jobs. In much the same way that a cake is a combination of simpler ingredients such as flour, sugar, eggs and milk, PsyCap involves the combination of four basic ingredients – hope, optimism, confidence and resilience. Research has shown that individually each of these ingredients can lead to desirable organizational outcomes, such as good health, persistence on difficult tasks and job performance, but together they represent an even more powerful resource than any of the ingredients on their own. Embedding the drivers of psychological capital in an organization’s culture is a smart way to promote a thriving organization.

Please Subscribe

ONLINE HUB

$9/month

  • Unlimited access to all online articles
  • Video library
  • Editor-curated reading lists
  • The weekly From The Hub enewsletter

Reuse and Permissions: Unauthorized distribution, transmission, reuse or republication of any and all content is strictly prohibited. To discuss re-use of this material, please contact: copyright@yourworkplace.ca ; 877-668-1945.  
head shot Jamie Gruman
WRITTEN BY
Jamie Gruman
Dr. Jamie Gruman is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behaviour. He has taught in the undergraduate program, MA Leadership Program, MBA program, and PhD program in Management at the University of Guelph. Dr. Gruman is the Founding Chair of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association. Dr. Gruman has consulted and delivered seminars for Fortune 500 corporations, public and not-for-profit agencies.
not all workplaces are equal

Not All Workplaces are Created Equally

Consider this. You’re at work, seemingly just doing your job. You’re tasked with looking into a matter that you know would negatively affect a client