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Is Your Wellness Program Missing Something?

When most people think about workplace wellness, they think of a guy in a tie eating an apple or that pile of pedometers gathering dust in the supply closet. Even the best intentioned wellness programs often don’t go far enough. While active living and nutrition are extremely important to a wellness culture, they’re really just a good start.

The Holy Grail of wellness encompasses not just physical health, but all other aspects of human existence including mental and emotional well-being. This means creating a wellness program that alleviates stress by helping employees build solid financial plans that can lead to financial health. It means setting wellness goals as a group, and working through them together in a social setting. Holistic wellness programs address mental health, stress management, work-life balance and even spiritual health.

Across the country employers are embracing holistic (or integrated) wellness programs because they help attract talent, improve productivity and reduce employee stress and absenteeism. Whether you are a newbie employer joining the movement or an experienced vet, consider the following five initiatives that will address different aspects of well-being to launch you to a more holistic wellness program.

Make. Work. Better.

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WRITTEN BY
Anita Sampson-Binder
Anita Sampson-Binder is a part-time professor in Human Resources Management at George Brown College in Toronto. She has also held several positions in recruitment strategy and delivery.

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Throughout the 35-plus years that she’s worked as a surgical nurse in an Eastern Ontario hospital, Donna has been a consummate professional. She’s trusted by