The Power of Co-Creation

The Power of Co-Creation

Build It with Them to Boost Growth, Productivity, and Profits

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Business books are a booming business. What’s left to write about? So many topics have been effectively tackled, leaving almost nothing new under the sun.Why have just plain chocolate or just plain vanilla when you can twist them together for something even more delicious? Individual interventions could work at an organizational level. Business can benefit from artistic processes. And what happens when you consider the fulcrum of the pendulum, not just the swinging action? Looking at the unobvious may sound – well – obvious! But it’s worth examining all the same. As a leadership coach, the term “co-creation” stands out for me as one of the fundamental tenets of coaching. It distinguishes coaching from teaching, mentoring, counseling, therapy and many other helping professions: the idea being that the coach and the client co-create solutions. It isn’t about one party giving answers to the other. Ideas, activities, goals and the entire coaching process are co-created. Ramaswamy comes from an esteemed background in developing organizational co-creation. In 2004, Ramaswamy and CK Prahalad co-wrote The Future of Competition, which became a best-seller, showing how value is jointly created between the company and the customers. Ramaswamy’s new book takes this even further. He and his co-author discuss how to become a co-creative enterprise, and share case studies from the field. They demonstrate how co-creation builds innovation, engagement and strategic leadership. While this book is certainly interesting, it is not an individually inspirational book. If you are creating a new business, you will certainly get some excellent ideas here on how to start your business in the way in which you mean to continue. However, if you are a mid-level career employee with little influence over the strategic direction and organization of your company, you may derive little value from this book, except wishing that you belonged to one of the profiled businesses.

 

Lisa Sansom