Tipping Sacred Cows

Tipping Sacred Cows

Kick the Bad Work Habits that Masquerade as Virtues

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Jake Breeden starts Tipping Sacred Cows: Kick the Bad Work Habits that Masquerade as Virtues with an account of his travels to Goa, India. There, the sacred cows of Hinduism have free reign over the city. They go where they want to go, eat what they want to eat, and mingle without interruption. Yet at the end of the day, they are led gently home to rest and give milk. The metaphorical sacred cows in our own lives are often still allowed to roam free, unquestioned, and we proverbially take them into our workplaces and revere them mindlessly. Breeden does not suggest that we abolish these practices, instead we should upend our own personal, metaphorical sacred cows. We should examine them to see if they are worth keeping, abolishing or modifying. It’s a worthwhile idea, but Breeden’s structure of Tipping Sacred Cows distracts from his argument. The chapter titles can be confusing and the metaphor sometimes fails him. Bottom line: no one business practice is going to work in every situation. It certainly makes sense that we critically examine our own sacred cows, ideally when they are just little calves. It gets much harder the more entrenched those practices become.

 

Lisa Sansom