Suchness

There are a number of reasons leaders may make less-than-optimal decisions. Some of these reasons involve time and information constraints. Other times, however, the reasons have more to do with psychology.

Take, for example, leaders who involve their ego in decision-making by considering alternatives positively that cast the leader in a favourable light. Sometimes leaders’ past successes blind them to how circumstances have changed by utilizing earlier tactics that may no longer be effective. Leaders, like the rest of us, also habitually fall victim to numerous psychological biases such as the confirmation bias in which we seek, gather and interpret information in a manner consistent with our pre-consistent with our pre-existing preferences or views.

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Dr. Jamie Gruman

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Dr. Jamie Gruman is Professor of Organizational Behaviour at the University of Guelph’s College of Business and Economics. He specializes in human sustainability and productivity in the workplace, and recently published the book, Boost.

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